How to Use Windows 10 Free Video Editor

Not only might you not know how to use Windows free video editor, but you might not even know that these options are present on your Windows laptop or desktop in the first place.

Turns out, the Windows 10 Photos app may actually be misnamed because you can make limited edits to the video using it. Microsoft also offers two free video editors – Video Editor and Clipchamp – in Windows 10, but they are more detailed tools. Using Photos lets you make basic edits — and some more advanced edits — from a familiar interface, and at no extra cost to you.

Read on for instructions on opening your video in the Photos app and for a brief overview of the tools available. Once you read this guide on how to use Windows 10 free video editor, you will have valuable knowledge the next time you need to make changes to some footage.


How to Use Windows Free Video Editor

1. Right-click your video file and open it in Photos OR select “Edit in Photos” in the Film & TV app

2. Use the various tools in Photos to edit and enhance your clip, such as the video trim, markup, or slow motion tools.

Read on to see detailed instructions for each step.


1a. Open a video clip in the Photos app. You may need right click then select Open with so what Pictures to ensure that the file opens in the correct application.

(Image credit: Tom’s Guide)

1b. Alternatively, after opening a video in the default Movie & TV app, select the Edit in photos button at the bottom right of the window.

(Image credit: Tom’s Guide)

From there, you have a surprising number of editing options, but they’re not particularly well marked. As good as we are here to point you in the right direction.

Video cutting: Select the leftmost icon at the top center of the window (which looks like a picture and a pen) or use the shortcut Ctrl+E.

(Image credit: Tom’s Guide)

From here you can change the start or end point of your video clip, or remove parts to focus only on the best parts of your footage Simply drag the blue handles to choose the start and end points. end, and use the blue pin to see what’s happening at some point in the frame.

(Image credit: Tom’s Guide)

Click on Save a copy when you’re done, which will then create a new file with your changes.

See more : Under the three dots icon on the right side of the top center buttons, you’ll find a few different options. The ones we are interested in for video editing are Surcharge and Edit more….

Edit videos in Windows Photos screenshot with three dots icon highlighted on top

(Image credit: Tom’s Guide)

Surcharge: Draw on the video to add annotations.

(Image credit: Tom’s Guide)

You can select multiple pen types and colors using the toolbar at the top of the screen, then save a copy when you’re done.

Edit videos in Windows Photos screenshot showing pen tools highlighted

(Image credit: Tom’s Guide)

Under the Edit more… menuyou will find even more options.

(Image credit: Tom’s Guide)

Add Slow Motion: Click it to open a new editing window that lets you play part of your clip at normal 0.5x speed or a brief moment at 0.25x speed. Use the slider at the top of the window to move between normal, slow or super slow motion, the white handles on the playback bar to cut the clip and the blue handles to choose where to apply the slow motion effect.

(Image credit: Tom’s Guide)

Add 3D effects: If your video lacks falling leaves, party balloons or other CG effects, you can add them in this submenu with many pre-installed options.

(Image credit: Tom’s Guide)

Simply click on an effect you like, then drag and resize it on the video as you see fit.

Edit Videos in Windows Photos

(Image credit: Tom’s Guide)

Add animated text: Similar to the 3D effects menu, selecting this option opens a new window where you can choose text presets, move them around, etc.

Edit Videos in Windows Photos

(Image credit: Tom’s Guide)

Create a video with text: This opens the built-in Microsoft Video Editor application, a more detailed video editing application. We will however save how to use this app for another article.

(Image credit: Tom’s Guide)

More options: It’s another three-dot icon, this time located on the video playback bar near the bottom of the window.

(Image credit: Tom’s Guide)

By clicking on it, you have the possibility to:

Save an image: Pick a highlight from the video and save it as a still image by dragging the blue dot to the point in the video you want to capture.

(Image credit: Tom’s Guide)

Choose the subtitle file: If you’re trying to make your video accessible to hearing-impaired people, you can upload subtitles with this option. This will take you to a File Explorer window where you can then select the correct file.


We’ve got more Windows tips to share if you’re in the mood for more. If you’re having trouble with incompatible images, maybe take a look at how to open HEIC files in Windows, while wanting to capture their desktop, you might need our guide on how to to take a screenshot on Windows 10. Users who need a better file search tool should take a look at how to enable enhanced search on Windows 10, while anyone who has upgraded their OS but prefer the way things were before should see how to change start menu from Windows 11 to Windows 10.


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