Lego’s Vidiyo Music Video Maker is a safe alternative for kids to TikTok

TikTok has become the fastest way to achieve success with a well-choreographed dance routine. The platform makes it easy to create and share fun videos, but as we’ve discovered with all social media to date, it’s not the safest place for kids. Lego wants their new Vidiyo experience to be a kid-friendly alternative to TikTok – except that instead of giving kids the chance to play in dance videos with their friends, Lego has made their minifigures the stars of the show.

Lego has remained a popular toy brand among kidsears for almost 90 years, but a big part of its success has been finding ways to stay relevant. In 1999, the company launched the first Star wars-themed sets, and afterwards made the very profitable decision to create sets based on popular licenses like Harry Potter and Marvel Comics. Lego has also successfully embraced video games and in recent years has recognized that mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets are a big part of a modern child’s childhood with Lego sets that connect the physical worlds. and digital game. These sets include the company’s Hidden Side line and, most recently, its collaboration with Nintendo on Lego Super Mario.

But unlike Lego Super Mario, in which the goal is to use physical Lego bricks to create a playable game. Super Mario Bros. Real-life video game level, Lego Vidiyo focuses more on the digital side of the game, using augmented reality to bring a collection of new Lego minifigures and accessories into an app that streamlines the music video creation process.

Photo: Andrew Liszewski / Gizmodo, Internal Art

At launch, you’ll have a choice of six sets of BeatBoxes featuring action figures representing various musical genres.

Photo: Andrew Liszewski / Gizmodo, Internal Art

Photo: Andrew Liszewski / Gizmodo, Internal Art

BeatBoxes are literal buildable boxes that can be used to store accessories and Vidiyo figures.

When the line officially launches on March 1, the physical side of Lego Vidiyo will include six $ 25 BeatBoxes, which are real little plastic boxes you can build to store and display your collection. Boxes come with a Lego minifigure representing a specific genre of music, a special “scan scene” that a smartphone or tablet camera uses to bring these toys into the app, and 16 Lego themed tiles called BeatBits that provide access to special effects, dance moves and filters.

It isn't immediately obvious what each BeatBits thumbnail does, but it doesn't take long to know what music video effect they trigger.  (Photo: Andrew Liszewski / Gizmodo) It isn’t immediately obvious what each BeatBits thumbnail does, but it doesn’t take long to know what music video effect they trigger. (Photo: Andrew Liszewski / Gizmodo)

The BeatBits are mostly distributed randomly within the BeatBoxes sets (each contains two that specifically match the musical genre) and Lego promises that 130 will be available throughout the first year. You can choose which of the BeatBoxes to buy based on your musical preferences or style, and the Vidiyo line also includes 12 additional Bandmates figures that can only be collected in $ 6 blind bags.

Photo: Andrew Liszewski / Gizmodo, Internal Art

Photo: Andrew Liszewski / Gizmodo, Internal Art

There are also 12 Vidiyo Bandmates that can be collected and used in a video, but they are not blind, they are blind, which makes it almost impossible to tell who you are getting.

Photo: Andrew Liszewski / Gizmodo, Internal Art

Photo: Andrew Liszewski / Gizmodo, Internal Art

Each Vidiyo Bandmate comes with musical accessories and three BeatBits tiles.

Except that while the Lego Minifigure collections and collectible Lego Super Mario villains come in literal plastic bags, allowing collectors to squeeze and smell the pieces to discern which character is secretly inside, the Vidiyo Random Bandmates come in small boxes, so finding all 12 could get expensive. The thrill of opening blind bags doesn’t outweigh the disappointment of ending up with five of the same minifigure, and I’d love to see Lego ditch that approach altogether.

With only around 30 tracks from the Universal Music Group library available, Lego Vidiyo feels a bit underwhelming at launch.  (Screen capture: Andrew Liszewski / Gizmodo) With only around 30 tracks from the Universal Music Group library available, Lego Vidiyo feels a bit underwhelming at launch. (Screen capture: Andrew Liszewski / Gizmodo)

There are two sides to the Vidiyo app: a social media-like feed containing short music videos that other creators have filmed and shared, and creating music videos, which starts with choosing a song. Lego has made much of its partnership with Universal Music Group for the Vidiyo experience, but at launch there will only be around 30 tracks to choose from, including more recent hits from Taylor Swift and The Weeknd and classic jams like “U” by MC Hammer I can’t touch that.

It’s a disappointing selection, but Lego has promised continued updates to the app, so hopefully the music library will be significantly expanded in the coming months.

Screenshot: Andrew Liszewski / Gizmodo, Internal Art

Screenshot: Andrew Liszewski / Gizmodo, Internal Art

The

Screenshot: Andrew Liszewski / Gizmodo, Internal Art

Screenshot: Andrew Liszewski / Gizmodo, Internal Art

Once you’ve selected a track, the Vidiyo app allows you to digitize your selected Bandmate and at least three of the BeatBit tiles using a small scene that comes with the BeatBoxes. It’s a pretty straightforward process, but I found that when there wasn’t enough light sometimes the app couldn’t identify all of the BeatBit tiles I had chosen – something that could potentially be frustrating. a child who has not experienced augmented reality technology.

Screenshot: Andrew Liszewski / Gizmodo, Internal Art

Screenshot: Andrew Liszewski / Gizmodo, Internal Art

Creating a clip is more like sitting behind the special effects controller of a stage performance where you trigger effects like pyrotechnics, costume changes, filters, or special dance moves.

Screenshot: Andrew Liszewski / Gizmodo, Internal Art

Screenshot: Andrew Liszewski / Gizmodo, Internal Art

When you watch your music video creation afterwards, the BeatBits thumbnails do not appear on the screen.

Vidiyo is like being in the control room during a live performance on stage of a song. The digitized figures, including additional artists, appear in the real world by setting a device’s camera using augmented reality, and while their movements and dance moves are synchronized with the music – which partly explains why the current track selection is so limited – and additional dance moves, video filters, and special effects, like falling balloons, pyrotechnics, costume changes, can be triggered by pressing on the BeatBits tile on either side of the screen.

It’s more about performance than anything else, as there is no editing capability in the Lego Vidiyo app, and Lego has no plans to add them. If you don’t like the clip you just created after watching it, there is nothing you can do to change it except take it from above.

Screenshot: Andrew Liszewski / Gizmodo, Internal Art

Screenshot: Andrew Liszewski / Gizmodo, Internal Art

The Vidiyo app takes the safety and privacy of children very seriously, with Lego promising to moderate every clip before it appears in the app, and numerous illustrations warning children to be vigilant and stay alert. security while shooting their videos.

Screenshot: Andrew Liszewski / Gizmodo, Internal Art

Screenshot: Andrew Liszewski / Gizmodo, Internal Art

Screenshot: Andrew Liszewski / Gizmodo, Internal Art

Screenshot: Andrew Liszewski / Gizmodo, Internal Art

Lego Vidiyo’s simplicity makes it an experience directly aimed at kids – Lego suggests 7-10 year olds are ideal users – and older fans of the construction toy won’t find much novelty or replay value after a few tunes. video making sessions. But if you have kids at home who seem to gravitate towards apps like TikTok despite your attempts to push them away, Lego Vidiyo could be a safe alternative. Not only is the app packed with pictorial warnings designed to keep children safe while shooting videos, Lego also fully moderates all music clips and content shared on the Vidiyo social feed to ensure they are all safe. for children and are also free. any details or identifying information that could compromise a child’s privacy.

I don’t see myself coming back to the Vidiyo app frequently or trying to track down every latest action figure in the new collection, but there is a 5 year old in my house who has so far devoted several hours (yes I know, but last year almost rewrote the rules of screen time in our house) working to become the next Spike Jonze or Michel Gondry. Vidiyo probably won’t be an AFOL (adult Lego fan’s) next obsession, but it could potentially be a great distraction to keep little ones away from your $ 1,000 Millennium Falcon.


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